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12 Bar Blues in A

The vast majority of blues songs (and rock and roll songs) are based on a
twelve bar pattern which is repeated. Over time there have been many
variations on this pattern.

 

chord-A chord-D7 chord-E7

 

A

A

A

A

D7

D7

A

A

E7

D7

A

E7

Play each chord 4 times.

Once you get to the end of the pattern, you can go straight back to the
beginning or finish up with one strum of the root chord (in this case A).

I’m your’s

Strumming pattern (D=down U=Up)

(d) (u) d – (d) (u) d –

With the strums in brackets being muted strums.
But that’s a little sparse if you are playing the uke by itself. So you could go with.

d u (d) u d u (d) u

Emphasizing the second and fourth beats.
D – XU – UDU

Stand by Me

The pattern is exactly the same throughout the song, 2 bars of C, 2 bars of Am, 1 bar of F, 1 bar of G7 and back to 2 bars of C.

Stand by Me has a really distinct rhythm and to make the song recognisable you’re really going to need to emulate that as closely as you can. If you’re new to Ukulele then I’d suggest this strumming pattern repeated throughout…

Strumming pattern (D=down U=Up)

D – DU – UDU

The as you get more comfortable thing about replacing the second down strum with a chuck/chunk/muted strum so the pattern becomes…

D – XU – UDU

Finally, if you really want to push it a little bit more, you can push it by hitting the body of your guitar for a more percussive sound.